• Kids At Risk Action 501c3 nonprofit advocates for abused & neglected children (since 2001)
    • This site contains over 1000 articles on child abuse, child protection
    • and issues facing abused children.

The following information is gathered from:

Kids Count, Children’s Defense Fund,& American SPCC

Nationally over 7 million U.S. children come to the attention of Child Protective Services each year according to a Children’s Bureau 2015 report.

  1. 37% of American children are reported to Child Protective Services by their 18th birthday (African American children are reported at 54%)
  2. 1 in 4 girls and 1 in 6 boys will be sexually abused before they turn 18 years old.13 
  3. 34% of people who sexually abuse a child are family members. 
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  5. 3% of girls were age 10 or younger at the time of their first rape/victimization, and 30% of girls were between the ages of 11 and 17. 
  6. 96% of people who sexually abuse children are male, and 76.8% of people who sexually abuse children are adults. 
  7. 325,000 children are at risk of becoming victims of commercial child sexual exploitation each year. 
  8. The average age at which girls first become victims of prostitution is 12 to 14 years old, and the average age for boys is 11 to 13 years old. 
  9. 4 million childrenreceived prevention & post-response services.
  10. Highest rateof child abuse in children under one (24.2% per 1,000).
  11. 80% of child fatalitiesinvolve at least one parent.
  12. Estimated that between 50-60% of maltreatment fatalities are not recorded on death certificates.

NATIONAL CHILD ABUSE STATISTICS

  • 4 million child maltreatment referral reports received.
  • 207,000 childrenreceived foster care
  • 3%of victims are neglected.
  • 2%of victims are physically abused.
  • 4%of victims are sexually abused.
  • 9%of victims are psychologically maltreated.
  • Over one-quarter (27.%) of victims are younger than 3 years.
  • 9%of the child abuse victims die from neglect.
  • 9%of the child abuse victims die from physical abuse.
  • 4%of children who die from child abuse are under one year.
  • More than 90% of juvenile sexual abuse victims know their perpetrator.
  • Child abuse crosses all socioeconomic and educational levels, religions, ethnic and cultural groups.

GRAPH – CHILD VICTIMS BY AGE:

Child Abuse Statistics Graph – The youngest children are the most vulnerable to maltreatment. 52 states reported that most victims were younger than 3 years. The victimization rate was highest for children younger than one year of age.

CHILD ABUSE & CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR

  • Children who experience child abuse & neglect are about 9 times more likely to become involved in criminal activity.6

CHILD ABUSE CONSEQUENCES

  • Abused children are25% more likely to experience teen pregnancy.6
  • Abused teens are more likely to engage in sexual risk taking, putting them at greater risk for STDs.6
  • About 30% of abused and neglected children will later abuse their own children, continuing the horrible cycle of abuse.7
  • In at least one study, about 80% of 21 year olds that were abused as children met criteria for at least one psychological disorder.15
  • The financial cost of child abuse and neglect in the United States is estimated at $585 billion.8

CHILD ABUSE RISK FACTORS

  • Alcohol abuse (parent/caregiver)—the compulsive use of alcohol that is not of a temporary nature.1
  • Drug abuse (parent/caregiver)—the compulsive use of drugs that is not of a temporary nature.1
  • Domestic violence (parent/caregiver)–abusive, violent, coercive, forceful, or threatening act or word inflicted by one member of a family or household on another.1

CHILD ABUSE & ALCOHOL/SUBSTANCE ABUSE

  • 1/3 to 2/3of child maltreatment cases involve substance use to some degree.12
  • In one study, children whose parents abuse alcohol and other drugs were three times more likely to be abusedand more than four times more likely to be neglected than children from non-abusing families.12
  • Two-thirds of the people in treatment for drug abusereport being abused or neglected as children.10
  • More than a thirdof adolescents with a report of abuse or neglect will have a substance use disorder before their 18th birthday, three times as likely as those without a report of abuse or neglect.13
  • 3% – 15.8%of children have a parent/caregiver alcohol abuse risk factor.1
  • 4% – 33.5%of children have a parent/caregiver drug abuse risk factor.1
  • 0% – 33.2%of children have a domestic violence abuse risk factor.1

Guns kill or injure a child or teen every half hour.

• In 2010, 2,694 children and teens were killed by guns and 15,576 were injured by guns. Guns killed more infants, toddlers and preschoolers than law enforcement officers in the line of duty.

• U.S. children and teens are 17 times more likely to die from gun violence than their peers in 25 other high-income countries.

  • Since 1963, three times as many children and teens have died from guns on American soil than U.S. soldiers killed in action in the Vietnam, Afghanistan and Iraq wars. • Gun violence disproportionately affects children of color. In 2010, Black children and teens were nearly five times and Hispanic children and teens were more than three times more likely to be killed by guns than White children and teens.
  • United States military and law enforcement agencies possess 4 million guns. U.S. civilians have 310 million. Every year American companies manufacture enough bullets to fire 31 rounds into every one of our citizens

Preventable Costs • Child poverty costs the nation at least $500 billion each year in extra education, health and criminal justice costs and in lost productivity. • Child abuse and neglect cost the U.S. $80.3 billion each year in direct costs and lost productivity. A single case of nonfatal child abuse and neglect costs $210,012 over a lifetime, and a case of fatal child abuse and neglect $1.27 million, mostly due to lost productivity.

  • Gun deaths and injuries cost the U.S. $174.1 billion each year, or 1.15 percent of our total gross domestic product (GDP).
  • Racial and ethnic health disparities cost the U.S. an estimated $1.24 trillion in medical costs and lost productivity between 2003 and 2006. • The high school students who dropped out of the class of 2011 will cost the nation’s economy an estimated $154 billion in lost income over the course of their lifetimes.
  • The gap between Black and Hispanic compared to White high school achievement in 1998 cost the U.S. $310 to $525 billion in lost GDP by 2008 and the income achievement gap cost $400 to $670 billion. •

The achievement gap between American students and those in top-performing countries like Finland and Korea in 1998 cost the nation $1.3 to $2.3 trillion in 2008 or 9 to 16 percent of GDP. We Can Afford to Do Better

  • The amount the U.S. spends per minute on corporate tax breaks would pay the salary of 16 child care workers. More than 220,000 children are currently on waiting lists for child care assistance. Expanding child care increases poor mothers’ work participation. • Three days’ worth of the amount the U.S. spends on corporate tax breaks would provide a whole year’s worth of SNAP food assistance for the estimated 737,000 children who don’t have enough food.
  • The amount the U.S. spends a year on corporate tax breaks for private jets would pay the salary of 6,400 high school teachers.
  • All poor infants and toddlers could have been served by Early Head Start if the government diverted just 18 days of defense spending. Currently only about 4 percent of eligible children reap the benefits of this high quality early learning experience. Quality early education programs return 7 to 10 percent a year for every dollar invested.
  • More than 17,500 low-income children could enroll in Head Start for a year for the cost of just one F-35 fighter jet among the nearly 2,500 the Department of Defense is scheduled to buy. The State of America’s Children The State of America’s Children®® 2014
  • 9 “If we are to teach real peace in this world, and if we are to carry on a real war against war, we shall have to begin with the children.” “Poverty is the worst form of violence.”

Child Well-Being 50 Years After the Launch of War on Poverty – I n 1964, President Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty in his State of the Union Address. Fifty years later, how have American children fared? Fair Start: Rich Get Richer While Working Families Struggle

• In 2012, child poverty was 5 percent lower than in 1964 but 64 percent higher than the lowest recorded level — 14 percent in 1969 — and 21 percent higher than before the recession. The Black-White ratio for child poverty decreased 26 percent from 1964 to 2012. Black children remained three times more likely than White children to be poor in 2012.

  • Taking into account government benefits, child poverty and child extreme poverty were cut by over a third from 1967 to 2012. • Income inequality has increased dramatically. The top 1 percent of earners received 22.5 percent of the nation’s income in 2012, more than double their share in 1964 and equal to levels last seen in the 1920s.
  • The federal minimum wage is now worth 22 percent less in inflation-adjusted terms than in 1964. In no state can an individual working full-time at the minimum wage afford the fair market rent for a two-bedroom rental unit and have enough for food, utilities and other necessities. Head Start: Progress and Peril
  • The percent of children living in single-parent households more than doubled between 1964 and 2012 and in 2012 children in single-parent families were nearly four times more likely to be poor than children in married-couple families. While the Black-White ratio decreased 35 percent, Black children are more than twice as likely as White children to live with only one parent. • Teen births have been cut nearly in half since 1970 and the Black-White ratio has decreased by a quarter since 1980. The U.S. teen birth rate is the second highest among industrialized countries.
  • The percent of 3- and 4-year-olds enrolled in preschool or kindergarten more than quintupled between 1964 and 2012.
  • There are 19 percent more high school graduates and 162 percent more college graduates and Black-White gaps have decreased substantially. However, a majority of fourth and eighth graders remained unable to read or compute at grade level in 2013 and there are large achievement gaps by income and race. School segregation by race and income continues to be the norm. Healthy Start: Important Gains but More to Do
  • Infant mortality decreased three-quarters between 1964 and 2011 but the Black-White ratio grew 14 percent since 1980. In 2011 Black babies were more than twice as likely to die as White babies. The U.S. infant mortality rate remains one of the highest among industrialized nations. Safe Start: Children Losing a War at Home
  • Gun deaths of children and teens increased 31 percent between 1964 and 2010, and the BlackWhite ratio more than doubled leaving Black children and teens nearly five times more likely than White children and teens to be killed by a gun in 2010. The State of America’s Children® 2014
  • 11 Changes in Key Child and National Well-Being Indicators From 1964 to 2012
  • Children’s Defense Fund Each Day in America for All Children:
  • 2 mothers die in childbirth. 4 children are killed by abuse or neglect.
  • 5 children or teens commit suicide.
  • 7 children or teens are killed by guns.
  • 24 children or teens die from accidents.
  • 66 babies die before their first birthdays.
  • 187 children are arrested for violent crimes.
  • 408 children are arrested for drug crimes.
  • 838 public school students are corporally punished.*
  • 847 babies are born to teen mothers.
  • 865 babies are born at low birthweight.
  • 1,241 babies are born without health insurance.
  • 1,392 babies are born into extreme poverty.
  • 1,837 children are confirmed as abused or neglected.
  • 2,723 babies are born into poverty.
  • 2,857 high school students drop out.*
  • 4,028 children are arrested.
  • 4,408 babies are born to unmarried mothers.
  • 16,244 public school students are suspended.* *Based on 180 school days a year.
  • Each Day in America for White Children 1 mother dies in childbirth.
  • 1 child is killed by abuse or neglect. 2 children or teens are killed by guns.
  • 4 children or teens commit suicide.
  • 15 children or teens die from accidents.
  • 30 babies die before their first birthdays.
  • 88 children are arrested for violent crimes.
  • 303 children are arrested for drug crimes.
  • 331 babies are born to teen mothers.
  • 345 babies are born into extreme poverty.
  • 404 public school students are corporally punished.*
  • 407 babies are born at low birthweight.
  • 633 babies are born without health insurance.
  • 737 babies are born into poverty.
  • 805 children are confirmed as abused or neglected.
  • 1,066 high school students drop out.*
  • 1,718 babies are born to unmarried mothers.
  • 2,645 children are arrested.
  • 5,233 public school students are suspended.* *Based on 180 school days a year.
  • 13 Each Day in America for Hispanic Children* 1 child is killed by abuse or neglect.

1 child or teen commits suicide.

1 child or teen is killed by guns.

4 children or teens die from accidents.

13 babies die before their first birthdays.

56 public school students are corporally punished.**

173 babies are born at low birthweight.

285 babies are born to teen mothers.

399 children are confirmed as abused or neglected.

408 babies are born without health insurance.

595 babies are born into extreme poverty.

834 high school students drop out.**

1,153 babies are born into poverty.

1,330 babies are born to unmarried mothers.

3,453 public school students are suspended.**

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