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  1. Recent comments on this post from Linked In;

    Mary Carrier Arcement
    Supervisor Juvenile Dept Lafourche Parish District Attorney’s Office/Secretary to ADA Anthony P Lewis

    After starting in the juvenile section of the law, the problem is the start of a good family home. Not every jv in the system has a chance. Those that deal with these children are at a loss. Our outlets for those who truly need us, are no longer available. Not every child in the system, has that chance and it is a down right disgrace. My heart goes to them. I am only one individual, but, I am sure there are you or there who feel the same way?
    Like (3) Reply privately Flag as inappropriate 2 days ago Robin B., Dana H. and 1 other like this

    Robin
    Robin Boucher
    at Department of Juvenile Justice Delinquency and Prevention

    Unfortunately those of us in the helping occupations do have limitations on what we can do. We are unable to promise every child the basics of safety and health care because we are not a Big Brother society. Parents continue to have the vast majority of the say-so regarding their children, and sometimes their wishes are counter to the long or short term health (physical, mental) of their child/ren. Our country’s roots demand strict laws regarding what government agents (which is what many of us really are) may or may not do within the family structure. I am not arguing for a Big Brother society but am pointing out the limitations. I agree with the desire of the poster on a theoretical and philosophical basis but on a practical basis, we can not guarantee these things to children if parents are unwilling to do that which is necessary for the provision of these services. And it happens (or, rather, doesn’t happen) – a lot. A recent non-delinquent example is the controversy over autism and vaccines. Scientists vehemently deny any connection but many parents still do not want their children to be vaccinated. As a result, measles and chicken pox are returning. We can’t force these parents to vaccinate their children. Similarly, we cannot force parents to enforce curfews, monitor their children, clean up their own acts, etc. etc. We live in a “free” country and this is one unfortunate characteristic of that.

    Jackie Ross
    Social Services Administrator

    Those of us in the helping professions have limitations if we choose to work that way. It seems to me that the former writer is taking a very lofty approach to some very horrible real life problems. Of course “Big Brother” is watching over us, but hardly for the good of the republic. It has been said that, “It takes a village to raise a child” & this is so true. If families are not capable of raising their own children, then either systems become involved, or organizations that are able to make a difference, & sometimes ordinary citizens taking an interest. Sometimes, the faith based community can step in too. I don’t consider myself as a social worker, a “government agent”. Of course parents can be forced to be responsible for their children, but if they’re children are in the judicial system, then these parents can be court ordered to be responsible for them. Unfortunately, in all too many states though, it takes a gutsy family court judge to do that, & there aren’t enough of those around. If it’s not families who are responsible for their own children, than who is? If their children are under the age of eighteen, parents are very much supposed to be responsible, & if they are unable to, then some system has to step in. Your words sound like you are part of a Child Protection Agency. Here in New Jersey, that agency is called DYFS (Division of Youth & Families) & they’ve done, & continue to do a very botched up job of protecting our most valuable resource, our children.
    Like (1) Reply privately Flag as inappropriate 14 hours ago Dana H. likes this

    Dana H.
    Volunteer-Legal Researcher
    Top Contributor

    Very well said Jackie! very well said.
    Like Reply privately Flag as inappropriate 8 hours ago
    Dana H.
    Dana
    Dana H.
    Volunteer-Legal Researcher
    Top Contributor

    “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

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